Smoked Chicken

Going to smoke some chicken. Getting marinated in some salt water and lime brine.

My brine solution is nothing fancy. You dissolve 4 table spoons of salt in a couple of cups of really hot water. Then ice down the water and stir to make it completely chilled. Then poor over whole chicken or part of it on one half and part on the other evenly and then fill with more water to cover chicken (may have to weight it down with something).  You can add some other seasoning if you like to the brine like teriyaki or soy sauce, some rosemary, garlic, etc (experiment). Cover and refrigerate over night. Rinse well before seasoning. Add maybe just a light sprinkle of salt if you want

Going to make one 1/2 lemon pepper and one pepper and garlic. Will update this as I go. I coated it with olive oil 1st, then seasoned it all over, and under the skin as far as I could.

Looking Good, after about an hr. Got a little hot on one side, though. 😉

3 hrs later, the finished product. It was good. Could have used a little more time in the brine maybe or maybe some season salt.

Char-Broil 430 Offset BBQ Smoker Pit Mod

Made a little modification to my Char-Broil 430 Offset Smoker for better smoking.

So I got this little Char-Broil offset smoker (430 model) on a whim when my propane grill was on the fritz and my other pit had rusted out too much.

It’s small, cheap, and was easy to put together. Has just enough room to smoke a small brisket or a full rack of ribs. And, plenty of room to grill enough steaks or burgers for my family of 4.

It works great as a grill, but when I 1st started to use it as a smoker, I had some problems. It’s made of very thin metal, and has several gaps where the smoke and heat can escape. So I had to experiment a lot with the dampeners to get the airflow right, to get the temps where I wanted them. But, I came up with a way for it to work a little better.

I had a steel company (West Texas Steel) cut me a metal plate (16 gauge thickness I think) to fit over the smoking chamber where the grill grates normally sit (cost about $11). The plate leaves about an inch gap at the end, close to the side where the smoke stack sits over, for the smoke to escape there.

Then I lined the bottom of the smoke chamber and the little coal grates that sit in the bottom, with heavy duty foil. I set my meat directly in there. Then put the plate inside and on top of the rails, where the grill grates normally sit. It fit perfect!

I also drilled a hole and added a extra temp gauge in the bottom half of the smoking chamber, so I could monitor the temp where the meat was.

Worked great! Held in more of the heat and cooked more even. Only problem I have now is, the smoke box does not hold enough coals to keep it going for a long while. So you can’t slow cook all day or night without needing to add more coals a few times.

Anyway! Our little 4th of July brisket turned out pretty good!